Long-term survival worse for black survivors of in-hospital cardiac arrest

Blacks who survive cardiac arrest during hospitalization have lower odds of long-term survival compared with similar white survivors, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation. Half the difference in 1-year survival rates, however, remained unexplained. Nearly one-third of the racial difference in one-year survival was dependent on measured patient factors. Only a small proportion was explained […]

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Cabozantinib improves survival in advanced hepatocellular cancer

(HealthDay)—Cabozantinib results in significantly longer overall and progression-free survival than placebo among patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma, according to a study published in the July 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. Ghassan K. Abou-Alfa, M.D., from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, and colleagues randomized 707 patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma in a 2-to-1 […]

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Simple test to predict likely spread of rare cancer

New QUT research has shed fresh light on how head and neck cancer spreads to other organs and researchers are developing a simple blood test to tell doctors which patients are at risk of spread long before conventional imaging can. The research team, headed by Associate Professor Chamindie Punyadeera, present their findings this week at the international Saliva and Liquid […]

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High patient burden with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis

(HealthDay)—Patients with moderate/severe atopic dermatitis (AD) have higher patient-reported burden than those with mild AD, regardless of disease control, according to a study published online July 3 in JAMA Dermatology. Eric L. Simpson, M.D., from the Oregon Health & Science University in Portland, and colleagues characterized the patient-reported burden of AD in a cross-sectional study using data from six academic […]

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Research derives muscle stem cells from teratomas

Researchers at the University of Minnesota Medical School have developed a process to regenerate skeletal muscle cells in mice with muscular dystrophy. The unlikely source of those cells is a type of benign tumor called a teratoma. In a study published in Cell Stem Cell‘s July 5, 2018 issue, Michael Kyba, Ph.D. and Lillehei Heart Institute colleagues Sunny Chan, Robert […]

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Spleen microbes of wild animals change with tick-borne illness

Anaplasmosis, a tick-borne febrile disease, can be carried by wild mammals before being transmitted to humans through a tick bite. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have found that Anaplasma bacteria alter the patterns of other microbes in the spleens of mice and shrews. The spleen, in mammals, acts as a blood filter. While studies have looked at […]

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Higher risk of heart defects in babies of mothers with type 1 diabetes

Pregnant women with type 1 diabetes run a higher risk of having babies with heart defects, especially women with high blood glucose levels during early pregnancy, a study from Karolinska Institutet and the Sahlgrenska Academy in Sweden published in The BMJ shows. It has long been known that patients with type 1 diabetes are at increased risk of complications. A […]

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Why do kids lie, and is it normal?

Children typically begin lying in the preschool years, between two and four years of age. These intentional attempts at deception may worry parents, who fear their child will become a pint-sized social deviant. But from a developmental perspective, lying in young children is rarely cause for concern. In fact, lying is often one of the first signs a young child […]

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Pembrolizumab not better than PTX for advanced gastric cancer

(HealthDay)—For patients with previously treated advanced gastric cancer or gastro-esophageal junction cancer, pembrolizumab does not result in a significant improvement in overall survival compared with paclitaxel, according to a study published online June 4 in The Lancet. Kohei Shitara, M.D., from National Cancer Center Hospital East in Kashiwa, Japan, and colleagues randomized patients with advanced gastric or gastro-esophageal junction cancer […]

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Staying safe in the sun — a dermatologist helps separate facts from hype

Skin cancer is the number-one cancer diagnosis in the United States – it’s more common than breast, prostate, and lung cancers combined. Skin cancers can be divided into two types – nonmelanoma (basal and squamous cell carcinomas) and melanoma, with melanoma being the least common but most life-threatening. Each year, some 90,000 people are diagnosed with melanoma. Sarah Arron, MD, […]

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