High incidence of myopia among chinese schoolchildren

(HealthDay)—The incidence of myopia among Chinese students may be as high as 20 to 30 percent each year from first grade onward, according to a study published online July 5 in JAMA Ophthalmology. Sean K. Wang, from Sun Yat-sen University in Guangzhou, China, and colleagues performed an observational cohort study to examine the incidence of myopia and high myopia based […]

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Citizen science supports tick-borne disease research

A nationwide investigation of the prevalence and distribution of ticks and exposure to tick-borne diseases highlights the value of public participation in science. The study, published on July 11th in the open-access journal PLOS ONE, was conducted by Nathan Nieto of Northern Arizona University and colleagues, and funded by Bay Area Lyme Foundation. Tick-borne pathogens have emerged or have expanded […]

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Stress affects people with schizophrenia differently, study shows

Stressful situations affect the brain and body differently in people with schizophrenia compared to people without the mental illness or individuals at high risk for developing psychosis, a new CAMH study shows. The relationship between two chemicals released when people experienced stress—one released in the brain and the other in saliva—differs in people with schizophrenia. The discovery, recently published in […]

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Hepatitis B—stopping a silent killer

Every year, hepatitis B kills more than 780,000 people around the world, and is the single most serious liver infection, according to the World Health Organization. David Hutton, associate professor of health management and policy at the University of Michigan’s School of Public Health, says early diagnosis and treatment is key to stopping the spread of the disease in the […]

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Startup developing novel treatment for life-threatening lung condition

A Purdue University-affiliated startup developing a novel treatment for a life-threatening lung condition known as acute respiratory distress syndrome, or ARDS, is taking part in a prestigious startup accelerator program where about $2 million in funding is available. Spirrow Therapeutics (formerly Spiro Therapeutics) was selected to be a finalist from a pool of 1,600 applicants to take part in MassChallenge, […]

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Researchers clarify role of mutations in glioblastoma

Researchers from the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center have discovered how different mutations in a specific gene help drive glioblastoma, the most lethal form of brain cancer. In the preclinical study, researchers investigated whether the location of the mutation within the sequence of the PIK3CA gene affected the mutation’s ability to help drive cancerous growth. They also […]

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What separates the strong from weak among connections in the brain

To work at all, the nervous system needs its cells, or neurons, to connect and converse in a language of electrical impulses and chemical neurotransmitters. For the brain to be able to learn and adapt, it needs the connections, called synapses, to be able to strengthen or weaken. A new study by neuroscientists at MIT’s Picower Institute for Learning and […]

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Blood flow in the heart revealed in a flash

Researchers at Linköping University have for the first time been able to use information from computer tomography images to simulate the heart function of an individual patient. Some of the modeling methods they use were developed in the motor industry. The results of their study have been published in Radiology. Computer tomography systems, also known as CT scanners, are found […]

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