Active surveillance of lung subsolid nodules reduces unnecessary surgery and overtreatment

Subsolid nodules (SSN) can be considered a biomarker of lung cancer risk and should be managed with long-term active surveillance. Conservative management of SSN will reduce unnecessary surgery and overtreatment in patients with multiple comorbidities and aggressive lung cancer arising from lung sites other than the SSN. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the world. Typically, […]

Read more

Retooled vaccine raises hopes as a lower-cost treatment for Type 1 diabetes

For Hodalis Gaytan, 20, living with Type 1 diabetes means depending on an assortment of expensive medicines and devices to stay healthy. Test strips. Needles. A glucose meter. Insulin. The increasing cost of Type 1 diabetes, one of the most common serious chronic diseases, has created heavy financial burdens for families and generated controversy, with insulin prices more than doubling […]

Read more

Neurons can carry more than one signal at a time

Back in the early days of telecommunications, engineers devised a clever way to send multiple telephone calls through a single wire at the same time. Called time-division multiplexing, this technique rapidly switches between sending pieces of each message. New research from Duke University shows that neurons in the brain may be capable of a similar strategy. In an experiment examining […]

Read more

Pregnancy history may be tied to Alzheimer’s disease

A woman’s history of pregnancy may affect her risk of Alzheimer’s disease decades later, according to a study published in the July 18, 2018, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study found that women who give birth to five or more children may be more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease than women […]

Read more

The $17 Acne Treatment That Kylie Jenner and Bella Hadid Are Obsessed With

It’s true that celebs often have hair stylists and makeup artists to help them look gorgeous, but even A-listers struggle with skin issues like acne from time to time. And while they may look flawless on the red carpet, social media allows for a little more realness. Case in point: Bella Hadid, Kylie Jenner, and Riverdale actress Lili Reinhart recently shared social […]

Read more

Why men might recover from flu faster than women

Men may recover more quickly from influenza infections because they produce more of a key lung-healing protein, a study from scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests. The scientists, whose findings are published online in Biology of Sex Differences on July 17, infected live mice and human cells derived from male humans with influenza virus, and found […]

Read more

Convergence of synaptic signals is mediated by a protein critical for learning and memory

Inside the brain, is a complex symphony of perfectly coordinated signaling. Hundreds of different molecules amplify, modify and carry information from tiny synaptic compartments all the way through the entire length of a neuron. The precise interplay of these proteins is critical for normal neuronal function; ultimately allowing the brain to achieve feats like cognition, decision making, and sensory perception. […]

Read more

The past and present of mental health care

Stories about the issues surrounding mental health care are seeing a greater prominence in the media as policy-makers, politicians and activists raise questions about the quality of care and treatment being delivered in the province and across the country. At the same time, campaigns such as Bell Let’s Talk—an initiative to promote mental health education, research and awareness—are attempting to […]

Read more

Two regimens fail to stop declines in β-cell function

(HealthDay)—Neither glargine followed by metformin nor metformin alone halts the progressive deterioration of β-cell function in youth with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) or recently-diagnosed type 2 diabetes, according to a study published online June 25 in Diabetes Care. On behalf of the RISE Consortium in Rockville, Md., Sharon L. Edelstein and colleagues randomized 91 pubertal, overweight/obese 10 to 19-year-old youths […]

Read more

Sociodemographic disparities in eyeglass use among elderly

(HealthDay)—There are sociodemographic disparities in eyeglass use by age, race/ethnicity, education level, and income, according to a study published online July 12 in JAMA Ophthalmology. Benjamin Otte, M.P.P., from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, and colleagues conducted a cross-sectional study using data from the 2015 U.S. National Health and Aging Trends Study for 7,497 older adults, representing 43.9 […]

Read more
1 118 119 120 121 122 125