Molecular culprits of protein aggregation in ALS and FTLD

The mutated and aggregated protein FUS is implicated in two neurodegenerative diseases: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Using a newly developed fruit fly model, researchers led by prof. Ludo Van Den Bosch (VIB-KU Leuven) have focused on the protein structure of FUS to gain more insight into how it causes neuronal toxicity and disease. ALS and […]

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Scientists uncover the role of a protein in production and survival of myelin-forming cells

The nervous system is a complex organ that relies on a variety of biological players to ensure daily function of the human body. Myelin—a membrane produced by specialized glial cells—plays a critical role in protecting the fibers that help carry messages throughout the body. In the central nervous system (CNS), glial cells known as oligodendrocytes are responsible for producing myelin. […]

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Overall cancer mortality rates decreasing for men and women

(HealthDay)—Cancer incidence rates have decreased among men but remained stable among women, while cancer death rates are decreasing for both men and women, according to a report published in the July 1 issue of Cancer. Kathleen A. Cronin, Ph.D., M.P.H., from the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Md., and colleagues examined trends in age-standardized incidence and death rates for all […]

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Link for asbestos-free talcum powder, cancer not clear

(HealthDay)—Talcum powder, made from talc, which contains asbestos is considered carcinogenic to humans, while the carcinogenicity of talc without asbestos is unclear, according to the American Cancer Society. Talcum powder is widely used in cosmetic products. Some talc contains asbestos, although all talcum products used in homes in the United States have been free from asbestos since the 1970s. In […]

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Mobile phone radiation may affect memory performance in adolescents

Radiofrequency electromagnetic fields may have adverse effects on the development of memory performance of specific brain regions exposed during mobile phone use. These are the findings of a study involving nearly 700 adolescents in Switzerland. The investigation, led by the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH), will be published on Thursday, July 19, 2018 in the peer-reviewed journal […]

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Greening vacant lots reduces feelings of depression in city dwellers, study finds

Greening vacant urban land significantly reduces feelings of depression and improves overall mental health for the surrounding residents, researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine and the School of Arts & Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania and other institutions show in a new randomized, controlled study published in JAMA Network Open. The findings have implications for cities across the […]

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New target protein for colon cancer identified

Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have identified a new potential target protein (c-Cbl) they believe can help further the understanding of colon cancer and ultimately survival of patients with the disease. They found colon cancer patients with high levels of c-Cbl lived longer than those with low c-Cbl. Even though scientists have studied this protein in other […]

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Framework to help integrate social sciences into neglected tropical disease interventions

It has long been argued that social science perspectives have a great deal to offer the world of global public health. A new paper, published this week in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, lays out an accessible and actionable socio-anthropological framework for understanding the effectiveness factors of neglected tropical disease (NTD) interventions. While strides have been made in integrating socio-anthropologists into […]

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Researchers develop novel bioengineering technique for personalized bone grafts

Scientists from the New York Stem Cell Foundation (NYSCF) Research Institute have developed a new bone engineering technique called Segmental Additive Tissue Engineering (SATE). The technique, described in a paper published online today in Scientific Reports, allows researchers to combine segments of bone engineered from stem cells to create large scale, personalized grafts that will enhance treatment for those suffering […]

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