Evolution of approval, regulation processes for drugs explored

(HealthDay)—The U.S. approval and regulation processes for pharmaceutical agents have evolved during the last four decades, according to a study published in the Jan. 14 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. Jonathan J. Darrow, J.D., from Harvard Medical School in Boston, and colleagues describe the evolution of laws and standards affecting drug testing, use of new approval […]

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Two more heartburn meds recalled due to possible carcinogen

(HealthDay)—The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is adding to a list of recalled lots of popular heartburn medications—including generic forms of Zantac—because the pills might contain small amounts of a suspected carcinogen. The substance, called N-Nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), is an environmental contaminant that can be found in water and foods and has been classified as a “probable human carcinogen” by the […]

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Few youths receive addiction treatment after opioid overdose

(HealthDay)—Less than one-third of youths surviving an opioid overdose receive timely addiction treatment, according to a study published online Jan. 6 in JAMA Pediatrics. Rachel H. Alinsky, M.D., from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, and colleagues retrospectively analyzed data from the Truven-IBM Watson Health MarketScan Medicaid claims database (2009 to 2015) from 16 states to identify 4,039,216 […]

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Trump unveils plan to import cheaper foreign drugs

Donald Trump’s administration unveiled a plan Wednesday to allow imports of lower-price prescription drugs from Canada and other countries, a top priority for the president ahead of next year’s election. But is unclear when the proposals would go into effect and Canada has indicated it is concerned about the potential impact for the supply of drugs on its own market. […]

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New math model could lead to more personalized cancer therapies

Researchers have found a new way to use math to better treat cancer and prevent its relapse. Using the first mathematical model of its kind, researchers at the University of Waterloo found a way to study the interactions between the immune system and different types of cancer cells. Using their new model, the researchers found that administering different cancer therapies […]

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Got a migraine? Relief may already be on your medicine shelf

According to a new report in The American Journal of Medicine, aspirin can be considered an effective and safe option to other, more expensive medications to treat acute migraines as well as prevent recurrent attacks. A review of randomized evidence suggests efficacy and safety of high dose aspirin in doses from 900 to 1,300 milligrams taken at the onset of […]

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Substance use, misuse and dependence: A PLOS Medicine special issue

This week sees publication of the first research papers that will form part of PLOS Medicine‘s latest Special Issue, which is devoted to understanding the substantial challenges caused by substance use and misuse and seeking to inform responses in the health sector and beyond. Content for the special issue has been selected along with guest editors Margarita Alegria, Steffanie Strathdee […]

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Opioid-related gifts from pharma companies linked to physician prescribing by specialty

Physicians who received gifts from pharmaceutical companies related to opioid medications were more likely to prescribe opioids to their patients the following year, compared to physicians who did not receive such gifts, according to a new analysis led by health policy scientists at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. The research, published today in the Journal of […]

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Thirty-three percent of people on anticoagulants take OTC supplements with potentially serious interactions

Nearly 98% percent of people prescribed direct-acting oral anticoagulants such as apixaban used over-the-counter products. Of those, 33% took at least one such product that, in combination with the anticoagulants, could cause dangerous internal bleeding. People on these medications largely lacked knowledge of some potentially serious interactions. Direct-acting oral anticoagulants are the drug of choice for stroke prevention in patients […]

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Half of all commonly used drugs profoundly affecting the gut microbiome, warn experts

A new study presented at UEG Week 2019 reports that 18 commonly used drug categories extensively affect the taxonomic structure and metabolic potential of the gut microbiome. Eight categories of drugs were also found to increase antimicrobial resistance mechanisms in the study participants. Researchers at the University Medical Center Groningen and the Maastricht University Medical Center looked at 41 commonly […]

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